Early Meissen Porcelain.

China cup and saucer.
Tea cup and
saucer. Circa 1745.
Meissen dinner plate.
Dinner plate
Circa 1770.
Antique China tea cup.
Tea cup
Circa 1750.
Meissen china circa 1745.
Tea cup and
saucer. Circa 1745.
Meissen cup and saucer.
Tea bowl and
saucer. Circa 1760.
Meissen cup and saucer.
Tea cup and
saucer. Circa 1775.

Coffee cup
and saucer. Circa 1750.

Coffee cup
and saucer. Circa 1740.

Meissen cup.
Circa 1755.

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The output of white porcelain in the early years was limited and it was not until 1713. Porcelain of the first period (1713-1720) has been called "Bottger porcelain". Fine lacework borders and overall scroll designs in gold were used in the decoration. Meissen's chinoiserie period began in the 1720s with the arrival from Vienna of Johann Gregor Horoldt who brought with him superior skills in enamel painting on porcelain. His contribution to Meissen was to develop a palette of very fine bright enamel colors and that were new to on glaze enamel colors on porcelain.