About Meissen Porcelain & Antiques.


Hi ! and A little about me .... My name is Andy, and I manage Meissen Porcelain & Antiques. My interest in the visual arts dates back many years . As a young man, before I came to the United States I had collected some minor examples of European porcelain. Much later in 1982, I began to acquire a few pieces of nineteenth century German porcelain after visiting a few Antique Stores in Chicago. Collecting has consumed most of my time and thoughts for more than two decades, since I began learning as a child at the side of my father. As the collection began to grow, my interest gradually began to focus on fine art and antiques, not only on porcelain. And when it has finally taken shape as a mirror of all ages and cultures, I feel an obligation to it and wish to share my experience and collection with all others who appreciate the art of collecting.

What I know, there is no easy way to learn about antiques. The price of an antique and its value are really two different though related topics for the knowledgeable buyer to consider. Value in an antique is established by the qualities inherent in the object itself, or in its history. These may be a combination of any of the following factors: rarity, condition, beauty, historical importance, or even who owned it. True art has nothing to do with age. Age alone does not necessarily make a thing valuable. It usually needs, also, to be good of its kind.

There are two basic reasons for buying fine arts and antiques: because you like them, or because you may hope to make money out of them. Buy what you love, all art of fine quality is a good investment. Buy what delights your senses and stimulates your imagination. Fine art is like a good marriage - it should provide daily pleasure, be full of constant surprises and offer the thrill of rediscovering your initial attraction over and over again.

The price of certain classes of antiques and fine arts having risen rapidly in recent years, it has been possible with little effort and less learning to make handsome profits over a short term. And remember, if you know that $ 100.00 is a fair price to pay for the art that you want, don't offer $ 25.00 for it. First of all, you'll never own any art, second you'll waste everyone's time, including your own.


Thank you.